Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of…

What is good with the countries of the world is that they always find a way to surprise us. The United States bans Kinder Surprises but not weapons, Denmark beats Russia 4-1, and Hungary passes a hyper-facho law banning children from seeing LGBTQ performances before they turn 18. And we like to be surprised (except for Hungary, who clearly didn’t understand the concept of a surprise). As a result, many objects that we use daily and which seem harmless to us have been banned in certain countries of the world. And that is surprising.

1. Objects already used (in Canada)

In Canada, to use Vinted, you risk the death penalty. No, it’s not true, but there are a lot of things that are prohibited for sale when they have already been used. Many objects are not completely banned but are subject to many restrictions if they have already been used, such as MP3 players for example. Used mattresses also have very special rules. You can only bring your mattress back to Canada with a certificate proving that you have properly cleaned and disinfected it. Yes, smuggling your dirty mattress into Canada is as hard as smuggling coke.

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...
Picture credits: Topito

2. Time travel films (in China)

In April 2011, China banned time travel films from the territory, because these films allegedly advocated superstition, fatalism and reincarnation. As a result, little Chinese girls will never have a normal childhood, because they will unfortunately never have the opportunity to fall in love with Marty Mcfly, like all young people their age. I pity you, ladies.

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...

3. Sunscreen (in Hawaii)

Big cheh for all Hawaiians who are seemingly doomed to sunburn their whole lives. Sunscreens have been banned several times because of the chemicals they contain. These chemicals destroy the coral reef and are dangerous to marine life. So, too bad for you Hawaiians, you shouldn’t live where the sun was.

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...

4. Balloons (in Europe)

You don’t know it because you might not have noticed yet, but a European treaty has passed that will ban balloons on plastic sticks from July 2021. It’s plastic, it’s recyclable no, it pollutes unnecessarily, no need to explain why it sucks. But enjoy these last days; in less than 10 days the balloons on the sticks will be gone forever. A minute of silence please.

5. Round doorknobs (in Canada)

Attention huh, I did say specifically the ROUNDS. Canada certainly prohibits a lot of things, but it is still not going to prohibit the inhabitants from having doors. Since 2014, it is forbidden to have round handles at home, because it is very difficult for the elderly and people with disabilities to access them. (And even for me in real life, personally I never understood anything about these handles so I’m going to live in Canada)

6. Plastic coffee capsules (in Germany)

The German authorities in the city of Hamburg were the first to decide that plastic coffee capsules had too big an ecological impact and were not worth using. Citizens are still allowed to use them in their machines, but companies no longer have the right since 2016.

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...

7. Whistles (in Guatemala)

Guatemala has banned whistles because they sound too much like police whistles. Even though the whistles are for children, Guatemala considers it best not to bring them back into the country. As a result, it prevents people from becoming government resisters. Handy for leaders. Not stupid, guys.

8. Cosmetic products with granules (in Canada, United Kingdom, Italy and Switzerland)

These micro-beads that can be found, for example, in toothpaste, in scrubs or in soaps, are then carried away by water and enter the sewage systems. From there, they eventually end up in rivers or oceans, and then in the bodies of fish, turtles or seagulls, hence the reason for their ban. So France, we don’t ban, we want to kill the seagulls????

9. Badgers (in Saint Lucia)

And when I say badger, I’m not talking about the animals of the forest, nor the big jerks who come to flirt with you heavily at the exit of the clubs. I am talking about shaving brushes, banned on the small island of Saint Lucia located in the Caribbean. Only, it is only those made in Japan that have been banned, because of the anthrax that arrived in many countries in the 20th century on false badgers supposed to be made of badger hair that carried the disease. Even though a century has passed, the authorities still do not want to accept them. After, well, it could have been worse, their badgers could have been carrying an emerging infectious disease, called coronavirus disease 2019 or Covid-19, caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and blocking the whole world for more than two years .

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...

10. Plastic food containers (in Australia)

Again, the reason seems rather logical, but Australia has also banned take-out foods in plastic containers, to protect their ecosystem. The Australian authorities are even thinking of going further, by banning lids, plastic bags and cotton swabs. Well done Australia.

Top 10 everyday objects that are prohibited in certain countries of the world, band of...

Related Posts

error: Content is protected !!