Kaamelott: 20 words that you only hear in the series

Kaamelott: 20 words that you only hear in the series

Thanks to the book “Le Parler de Kaamelott”, which playfully studies the origin of the sometimes incongruous words heard in Alexandre Astier’s series, discover 20 words that only the series allowed us to hear.

Casually, via Kaamelott, Alexandre Astier brought the slang of the French language up to date, but also words little used nowadays and some colorful expressions that perhaps had a tendency to disappear.

Thanks to the book Small crapahut in the speech of Kaamelott for the use of pegs and gratin, signed Stéphane Encel and who reviews 500 little-known words and / or slang proposed by the series, a little dive into these terms that only the series made us hear.

Boucane (Book I, episode 18)

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The boucanane designates the smell of the smoking of meats and fish. And apparently, Perceval is not a big fan of it!

Brignolet (Book III, episode 49)

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Arthur discovers that there is no more wine at the table and that the bread is very dry, and calls it “brignolet”. Brignon is a bread for dogs made with bran used in the north of France.

Cacarder (Book V, Episode 5)

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It is the sound emitted by geese. The dog barks, the goose cocks! One way for Lancelot to tell Méléagant that his chatter doesn’t really have a hold on him. At least he thinks so …

Canfouine (Book II, episode 10)

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The canfouine designates a dirty place which was used in particular to designate the military trenches. Léodagan designates by that the room of Karadoc and Mevanwi, and undoubtedly their bed, which is often used by the knight to store sausage, bread or cheese.

Estanco (Book I, episode 71)

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L’estanco means an unpretentious boutique. In Spain, the word designates shops with a monopoly on the sale of tobacco. Karadoc therefore does not necessarily pay a compliment to the innkeeper, although this “estanco” will become his official headquarters a few seasons later.

Fourgonner (Book III, episode 63)

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Perceval wonders what the Knights of the Round Table are doing, who according to him “van”. A synonym for agitate (stir in a van).

Fromgom (Book II, episode 25)

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Undoubtedly, given the context of the scene, the word is used instead of cheese or “frometon”, but it must be recognized that this term had never been heard before. Kaamelott ! Lady Seli and her mouse hunt had better believe expert Karadoc!

Gadins (Book II, episode 61)

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The word gadin has several meanings: it can designate the head; we can say “take a gadget” instead of falling. In the context cited, Hervé de Rinel rather uses the term as a synonym for pebbles or pebbles.

Gu (Book IV, episode 31)

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According to Stéphane Encel’s book, “Gu” comes from the Dauphinois lexicon and designates “God”, and is occasionally used as an expletive. In any case, this is the use made by the peasant Guethenoc vis-à-vis Roparzh.

Niaquer (Book IV, episode 90)

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The innkeeper takes liberties by offering the Knights Karadoc and Perceval to bet on dogfights. In Occitan, “niac” is the bite, the bite. To deny something is to make short work of it. By extension, “to have the niaque” is “to want”, to be ready to devour everything in its path.

Patacouèques (Book IV, episode 24)

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Without really looking for the origin of the word, we can find the origin of this line in The Adventures of Rabbi Jacob, spoken by the character played by Louis de Funès when he observes the terrifying Fares in the chewing gum factory. Joëlle Sevilla (Séli) and Alexandre astier are both big fans of De Funès, and remember that Kaamelott is dedicated to him.

Pebron (Book IV, episode 91)

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In Occitan, the Pebron denoted alcoholics in a pejorative way, as with the term “poivrot”. Over time, “pebron” became a general insult. Here, Arthur addresses Merlin, who has created cover plates but is unable to locate them.

Pégu (Book IV, episode 88)

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Comes from the Latin “peasant”, derived from pécore or péquenot, it designates in Kaamelott, and pejoratively, the peasant world or the people. “Pégu” (which should be pronounced “pégou” in good Latin) is one of the favorite words of fans of the series.

Pètzouille (Book VI, episode 5)

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Another way of calling someone pejoratively by comparing him to a peasant, a “pécore”. Could come from “pezan”, dialectal form of “peasant”, we learn from the work.

Ratichon (Book III, episode 72)

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Seli surprises Father Blaise who comes to cut himself a slice of ham in the middle of the night. In a pejorative way, an abbey or a religious seminary was called a “ratichonnière”, and a priest a “ratichon”. Did it come from the fact that they were often seen as “bookworms”, as “literati”?

Snarling (Book III, Episode 25)

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“Ronca” in Occitan means “to snore”, to sleep deeply.

Schproum (Book V, episode 4)

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Karadoc is afraid to double in the queue to Excalibur and wonders if that will not trigger “schproum”, synonymous with “scandal” popularized by the General de Gaulle. Le Larousse indicates it as a familiar term marking a “violent argument”.

Tagazou (Book 5, episode 4)

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Calogrenant reports to Arthur that Karadoc has given up on his attempt to extract Excalibur from his rock. In doing so, it would be – “in the conditional” – passed for a “tagazou”. This term designates in military slang an airplane and by extension a noisy armored vehicle. In short, something clumsy, which in the situation seems to stick rather well to the oratorical performance of Karadoc.

Tsoin-tsoin (Book VI, episode 8)

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Without definition or clear origin. The word is used in particular in The Visitors: “Your cousin de Montmirail, he would not be a little care, by any chance?”.

Zize (Book VI, episode 5)

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Karadoc and his friend tried to attack the Roman camp … together! A proof of courage or unconsciousness, whatever the case, they dare to threaten their guardians. “On vous zize” would be here a variant of “zigouiller”, but without the origin of the word being able to be traced.

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