Black Americans Who Served in WWII Faced Segregation and Second-Class Roles

Black Americans Who Served in WWII Faced Segregation and Second-Class Roles

When the Selective Training and Service Act became the country’s first peacetime bill in September 1940, civil rights leaders pressured President Franklin D. Roosevelt to allow black men to register and serve in integrated regiments.

Although African Americans had been involved in every conflict since the War of Independence, they had done so in isolation, and Henry Stimson, the Secretary of War, appointed by FDR, was not interested in changing the status quo. Faced with the need to bolster the U.S. armed forces as the war escalated in Europe, the FDR decided that black men could enter the draft, but they would remain separate and the military would determine the proportion of blacks inducted into the draft. service.

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Vanniyar Adrian

Vanniyar Adrian is a seasoned journalist with a passion for uncovering stories that resonate with readers worldwide. With a keen eye for detail and a commitment to journalistic integrity, Ganesan has contributed to the media landscape for over a decade, covering a diverse range of topics including politics, technology, culture, and human interest stories.