10 films that rocked your childhood if you grew up in the 90s

“Jumanji”, “The Mask”, “The Lion King” or “Save Willy” … Focus on some nostalgic nuggets that accompanied your childhood if you grew up in the 90’s!

10 films that rocked your childhood if you grew up in the 90s
Warner Bros.

JUMANJI (1995)

From the age of 8

“In the jungle you will wait. A 5 or an 8 will deliver you.” This little music, which cost young Alan Parrish years of exile in the jungle of Jumanji, also greatly stimulated our imaginations. At a time when home consoles still stammered in 8-bit, the prospect of a board game capable of releasing lions or alligators in our dining room was bound to spice up our recreation scenarios. At the helm of this wild and breathtaking adventure, too magical to be really disturbing, we find the director Joe Johnston (who had already enchanted us with Chérie, I shrunk the kids a few years before), and of course an actor whose only one face is enough to evoke the sweet nostalgia of the 90s: Robin Williams.

THE MASK (1994)

From the age of 8

In the 90s, there was therefore Robin williams to give us thrills of adventure and emotion, and then Jim Carrey, whose mission was rather to make us cry with laughter. Between Liar, Liar, Dumb & Dumber and other Batman Forever, this comedic genius who constantly seemed to have eaten a Looney Toon undoubtedly gave us some of our best laughs. More wacky and hilarious than ever in The Mask, it was playing Stanley Ipkiss – a bank clerk suddenly endowed with extraordinary powers – that Jim Carrey undoubtedly found the role that suited him best. Result of the races: an unforgettable performance, a fireworks display of gags, and above all, laughter bars.

THE LION KING (1994)

From 6 years old

In the midst of a decade when Disney Studios seemed to have been touched by grace and dutifully gifted us one masterpiece by one, arrived The Lion King. First envisioned as a second-hand feature film by the rulers of the Enchanted Kingdom, this “little film” took the whole world by surprise by becoming the greatest success in the history of animation at the time. Certainly, the story of Simba is far from being the only one to have rocked our 90s, and we could of course cite the adventures of Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, Mulan or Tarzan, not to mention the grandiose Hunchback of Notre-Dame. Nevertheless, symbolically, when we think back to this period, the first images that tend to arrive to us are those of a roaring lion on top of a rock, of a formidable herd of wildebeest, and of course of a warthog pushing the ditty alongside a mongoose.

JURASSIC PARK (1993)

From 10 years old

Depending on how old you were the year it was released (or when you discovered it a few years later), you may have had your eyes covered once or twice in front of this Spielberg film ( who refused to show it to his young children himself). However, and despite the few possible parental censures, Jurassic Park is also part of our collective imagination when we grew up in the 90s. “life always finds a way”, Spielberg’s film had no trouble making it through to our amazed eyes of apprentice spectators.

BEETHOVEN (1992)

From the age of 8

For a child of the 90s, Beethoven might well have been a German genius of classical music, but above all he was a good fat Saint Bernard taken in by a nice little American family. Like The Incredible Voyage or Babe, the pig turned shepherd, this warm and endearing feature film by Brian Levant offered the central role to animals, and brought together absolutely all the necessary ingredients to share a tender moment of cinema in family. Special mention to the musical theme of the film signed by Randy Edelman (and not by Luwig von Beethoven), deliciously nostalgic, as well as to the despicable veterinarian played by the brilliant Dean Jones (favorite actor from Disney studios in the 60s and 70s) .

TOY STORY (1995)

From 6 years old

A true technological revolution, a historic event for cinema, Toy Story is first and foremost a Proust madeleine for today’s thirties. Incarnated by the unforgettable voices of Richard Darbois and Jean-Philippe Puymartin (dubbing virtuosos, especially in the 90s), punctuated by an unstoppable story and by an unprecedented quality of animation, the toys of Pixar studios first marked the spectators who were still old enough to frequent them on a daily basis, before setting out to conquer the world.

SAVE WILLY (1994)

From the age of 8

A young orphan boy, a whale separated from his family, a sweet scent of before and a little harmonica tune to accompany it all: Save Willy is a story of friendship like no other, an extraordinary adventure that still appears more gigantic when discovered at the height of a child. This beautiful family epic served by an endearing cast (and in particular a much more sympathetic Michael Madsen than in Reservoir Dogs) offers us a speech engaged before the hour, some memorable scenes, and even one or two cult sequences. We also recommend its two suites, released in 1995 and 1997, very well made.

DARLING I SHUT THE KIDS (1990)

From the age of 8

Long before you throw the dice Jumanji and go wake up the dinos of Jurassic Park III, the director Joe johnston had fun shrinking the kids of Rick Moranis for Disney studios, giving us at the same time some wonderful memories of spectators. Inspired by famous feature films such as The Shrinking Man or The Inner Adventure, Honey I shrunk the kids knows his classics, but also knows how to stand out from them to surprise, innovate, create with an inventiveness worthy of his main character. With special effects that were truly breathtaking for the time and bathed in an atmosphere that not all CGI in the world could reproduce today, this film was also for us irrefutable proof that one could very well live thrilling adventures. while staying in our garden.

HOOK (1992)

From the age of 8

Steven spielberg at the bar, Robin williams on deck, and to complete the four-star crew of this magnificent pirate ship, loose: Dustin Hoffman, Julia Roberts, Bob Hoskins, Maggie Smith … and John Williams at the baton. What more could you ask for to summon the magic of Peter Pan, to give a second life to this somewhat dusty myth, and to bequeath to all the children of the 90s a real treasure? A secret safe that we still take pleasure in unlocking … even 30 years later.

MOM I MISSED THE PLANE (1990)

From the age of 8

Before making the eyes of millions of children sparkle in the 2000s by telling them about the first two years of Harry Potter at the sorcerer’s stone, Chris Columbus had already made others dream a decade earlier. Carried by the delicious breath of Christmas, by a touching humor and by the excellent score of John williams (him again!), Mum, I missed the plane is THE film in which we like to snuggle up with nostalgia every December 24 at night.

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